CMI Research: Trust Me, I’m a Manager

Posted on Oct 29, 2014 in Business Growth, Change, Leadership, Monthly Newsletter, Strategy

Would you let your doctor treat you, if you found out that they did not have any training?

Trust without training?

Trust me, I’m a Manager

Previous research by the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) showed that many people join an organisation, because of their reputation, but leave because of their experience of a ‘bad manager’.

Yet every year British businesses let thousands of managers loose on their people, without equipping them with the skills that they need to be effective in management roles. The CMI’s Management 2020 Survey of over 2,000 managers working in the UK today found that less than a quarter (23%) rated their employers as being “very good” or “good” at providing leadership training to managers before or within three months of being promoted into a management role. Well over a third (37%) revealed that their employer was “poor” at providing training or did not do so at all.

The Commission on the Future of Management and Leadership was created with the Chartered Management Institute (CMI). The Commission asked three key questions:

  1. How good are management and leadership in the UK today?
  2. What are the skills that managers will need in the future? and
  3. How can UK management be improved in order to deliver success by the year 2020?

The Commission identified key areas of good practice and created a Management 2020 Framework comprised of assessing performance in three areas:

  1. PURPOSE: What social benefit does the organisation exist to achieve and how are its leaders held accountable for these aims?
  2. PEOPLE: How does the organisation prepare managers and leaders at all levels?
  3. POTENTIAL: How does the organisation support the next generation of managers and leaders?

Overall, managers in UK organisations rated their managers and leaders at 5.9/10, equivalent to ‘could do better’. This is one measure of the potential for improvement in management skills.

Four areas stand out for us, given that we work with business leaders to enable them to transform themselves, their teams and their organisations:

  1. PEOPLE:  management training is usually ‘too little, too late’: only 23% of organisations rank as ‘good’ or ‘very good’ in terms of whether staff are trained in management and leadership before, or within three months of, taking on a new management role;
  2. IMPACT: the use of mentoring and coaching is very limited: it was rated as ‘good’ or ‘very good’ by only 24% of organisations, despite persuasive reporting of its effectiveness in helping managers improve their practical skills and make an impact at work;
  3. BUSINESS GROWTH: There were also key links between the PEOPLE scores and organisational growth. Almost 60% of organisations in decline do not train their staff or do so very poorly, compared to a much-reduced ‘poor’ score of 25% of growing organisations. 30% of growing organisations say training of staff immediately after a promotion is ‘good’ or ‘very good’,compared to 13% of managers in declining organisations;
  4. PERFORMANCE: It is not just the results that matter but also how those results are delivered. The best score for people practices was 43% scored as ‘good’ or ‘very good’ for the extent to which people are assessed for their behaviours, not just their results. This is contradictory. If the people are promoted to a management role, not provided with training or mentoring or coaching but then rigidly assessed for their performance, what standard of performance can you reasonably expect to get?

Please read the examples on our Testimonials page and give us a call.

Let’s discuss what management training, coaching or mentoring would maximize the success of your managers, and ultimately your company. What impact could that have, not just on the managers, but also on the motivation and commitment of those people who are being managed by them?

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